Dino Rossi
RE/MAX Preferred Properties | 617-312-3910 | [email protected]


Posted by Dino Rossi on 11/22/2015

Did you know the average household contains between 3 and 10 gallons of hazardous material at all times? This can be a threat to the health and indoor air quality of the home. How do hazardous materials enter your home?  They can enter in the form of cleaners, bleach, oil, light bulbs, paints, batteries, medicines, mercury-containing materials and other household items loaded with potentially harmful chemicals. So how can you keep your home free from these materials? First, you need to identify the hazardous materials in your home. They come in three forms: Solids (i.e. rat poison), Liquids (bleach, gas, antifreeze, drain cleaners.), Gases (such as natural gas or propane). The most important thing you can do to help make your home safer and avoid the dangers of hazardous materials is to store all hazardous materials properly. Always keep hazardous materials in the original container with the label for future reference. Follow all manufacturer suggestions for storage temperatures. Store flammables away from the home, any sources of flame or heat, and out of direct sunlight. Watch for fumes or other signs that the materials are not behaving properly. If you do detect fumes, wear a face mask, remove the leaking material, and ventilate the storage area properly to rid it of all dangerous toxins. Only purchase what you need when you need it. To further reduce your risk, look for safer alternative products like natural cleaners, mouse traps and paints.





Posted by Dino Rossi on 3/29/2015

With the recent scrutiny being placed on food quality in America, many people are looking to starting their own gardens. While there's no denying that keeping a garden can be a lot of work, the benefits of growing your own produce are hard to ignore. If you are thinking about trying out your green thumb, there are a few things to consider. What would you like to grow? Would you prefer a garden that you can keep indoors, or do you want an outdoor garden? How much time are you willing to dedicate to your new project? Herb gardens are a good start for anyone interested in growing useful plants. You can grow any combination of herbs indoors. Many herb kits exist, and can be purchased from your local gardening store for relatively cheap. These kits take the guesswork out of picking a complementary combination of herbs, and come complete with full instructions on how to maximize your little garden's potential. If your ambitions are bigger, you can opt for an outdoor garden. Outdoor gardens give you much wider selection of plants to choose from. Living in New England, you can count on about 120 frost-free days, so pay attention to the plants that you choose for your garden. You'll want to choose fruits and vegetables that can survive the occasional frost, and are considered relatively hardy. Here's a few ideas to get you started. Plants that do well in the climate of New England include tomatoes, asparagus, snow peas, zucchini, peppers, eggplant, and cucumbers. Tomatoes in particular offer a lot of variety, from the smaller cherry tomato, to more robust varieties like beefsteak. A newer variety of tomato called Glacier does fairly well in colder climates, and packs the same zest as the more fickle, hot-climate tomatoes. If you want to add a more unique fruit to your garden, you might also want to consider one of the heirloom tomato varieties. I've heard of a tomato called "White Wonder", which is a nearly all-white tomato that packs a whallop of flavor. Many types of berries do extremely well in New England summers. Why not try your hand at strawberries? Cavendish are a large, sweet variety of strawberries that do extremely well here, despite the harsh, unpredictable nature of our climate. For more information on gardening in New England, please visit the following link. http://www.gardeninginnewengland.com/index.asp Good luck!





Posted by Dino Rossi on 9/28/2014

Just because summer is over doesn't mean you can't have fun this fall. There is still plenty of good weather to get outside and enjoy the cooler temperatures and changing scenery. Here are just a few things to get you started having fun outside this fall: Plant bulbs in your garden for beautiful blooms next spring Tailgate at a football game Take a drive in the country Take a hike or a walk off the beaten path Get lost in a corn maze Go apple picking Go for a hayride Go leaf peeping Decorate your yard with fall fun Jump in a pile of leaves Visit a farmer's market Attend a fall festival What is your favorite fall activity?





Posted by Dino Rossi on 8/17/2014

They get grimy, dirty, smelly and can be some of the dirtiest things in your home. What are they? Your kitchen appliances! But with some everyday household items and a little bit of elbow grease, your kitchen appliances can look and smell like new for many years to come.   To clean your dishwasher: Regularly clean the seams and liner of your dishwasher this will help reduce bacteria buildup and improve its effectiveness. Scour the inside of your dishwasher with a pad dipped in baking soda to remove residue and stains from the interior surface and crevices of your dishwasher. Run a regular cycle of wash with lemonade. The ascorbic acid will help remove any remaining buildup, and leave your dishwasher smelling clean and fresh. To clean your oven/range: Loosen baked-on food inside your oven using a plastic spatula. Use the juice from two squeezed lemons to clean your oven. Place the juice into an oven safe dish, throw in the lemon remains and bake 30 minutes at 250 degrees. Now you have a clean and fresh smelling oven. To clean your refrigerator: Clean your refrigerator monthly. Remove all of the food from your refrigerator and discarding items that are aged or expired. Create a paste from ½ cup of baking soda with 1 tbsp of vinegar. Apply the paste to a soft scouring pad, and scrub. Wipe away any residue with a damp sponge, Vacuum the undercarriage of your fridge. Wipe down the outside with warm water and vinegar. Keep baking soda at the back of fridge to help keep it smelling fresh. There is no need for fancy cleaning products the things you have around the house will do just fine.  Do you have any other tips for keeping your kitchen spic and span?





Posted by Dino Rossi on 5/25/2014

Did you know that according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) most store-bought air fresheners contain formaldehyde, petrochemicals, p-dichlorobenzene and aerosol pollutants. There seems to be some kind of connection between air fresheners and Asthma problems. It is also thought that air fresheners containing these chemicals can accelerate respiratory diseases and reduce lung capacity. The EPA has not advised against purchasing these air fresheners, but suggests using them with care. If you have concerns about the health risks associated with these products, why not try a natural air freshening alternative. If you have a musty basement or smelly closet, a tray of natural clay cat litter may be helpful. The main ingredient in cat litter is a natural occurring mineral that absorbs odors and moisture from the air. If you prefer an alternative to cat litter, try diatomaceous earth which you can purchase at a garden supply store. Place it in a bowl or other open container in foul smelling areas. Placing fresh or used (dried) coffee grounds in a bowl or stocking will help to cut the odor of winter mustiness. Fill your home with subtle scents and refresh the air by simmering some sweet smelling ingredients in a little water on your stove. Try to keep your supply list simple and use items found at the grocery store or even in the yard. Citrus fruits like lemons and oranges make very fragrant scented waters. Herbs such as rosemary and thyme are good choices as well. Pine or cedar twigs and needles collected from the yard will give off a fresh, natural fragrance. Almond and vanilla extract and spices like cinnamon and cloves when simmered together add a wonderful fragrance to the air without the dangerous chemicals.